News & Events

In addition to workshops and conferences associated with specific projects run by the Centre, we also organize regular public seminars, reading groups and conferences. A central objective of all such events is to foster interdisciplinary collaboration between researchers working on issues in cognitive studies.

If you would like to be added to our email list for announcements of future events please email Bernardo Pino Rojas.


Public Seminar Series 2013-2014

 

Monday 23rd June 2014

Joseph Levine (Department of Philosophy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst)

The Conscious Mind and the Computational Brain: Where's the Gap?

3-5pm, Venue: Jessop Building (Music), JB-215. All are welcome!

Some Related papers:

Joseph Levine (2008) Secondary Qualities: Where Consciousness and Intentionality Meet. The Monist, 91.2, 215-36.

Joseph Levine (2010) Phenomenal Experience: A Cartesian Theater Revival Philosophical Topics, 20.

Joseph Levine (2014) Modality, Semantics, and Consciousness. Philosophical Studies, 167.3, 775-784.

 

Tuesday 10th December 2013

Clark Barrett (CEU Department of Cognitive Science and UCLA Department of Anthropology)

In Search of Human Nature: Cross-Cultural Studies of Universals and Variation in Human Cognition

3-5pm, Venue: Arts Tower, AT-LT08. All are welcome!

Abstract

Human nature isn’t just what’s identical across all individuals and cultures. Humans vary in personality, language, culture, and many other traits that are, nevertheless, the result of the evolutionary process. These often, therefore, take the form of local variations on universal themes. At least some of this variation may be the result of evolved developmental systems that project developmental experience into phenotypes, creating universality along some dimensions and variation along others. If so, how do we develop theories of these evolved mapping functions, and test between different hypotheses about their design? In this talk I present a series of experimental studies of cognition across cultures, and ask how we can begin to understand the variability and universality that these studies reveal within a common evolutionary, developmental, and cultural framework.

 

Friday 8th November 2013

John Doris (Philosophy–Neuroscience–Psychology Program and Philosophy Department, Washington University in St. Louis)

Talking to Our Selves: Reflection, Skepticism, and Agency

12-2pm, Venue: Hicks Building,HI-LT09. All are welcome!

Abstract

In philosophy, morally responsible agency is often understood as reflective activity – concerted, self-conscious mentation, predicated on accurate self-awareness.  In psychology, quantities of research on automatic processing problematize this understanding: much morally significant behavior is not consciously regulated, and much of it is informed by inaccurate self-awareness.  A psychologically lifelike conception of agency will therefore de-emphasize reflection; instead, the exercise of agency will be found in the collaborative social dialog by which human beings structure their lives together.

 

Wednesday 11th September 2013

Eric Schwitzgebel (Department of Philosophy, University of California, Riverside)

The Moral Behavior of Ethics Professors

3-5pm, Venue: Jessop Building,JB-SR 116. All are welcome!

Abstract

Do professional ethicists behave any morally better than do non-ethicists of similar social background? If not, do they at least show greater consistency between their normative attitudes and their outward behavior? Despite a long philosophical tradition associating philosophical reflection with improved moral behavior, these questions have never been empirically examined. I present convergent evidence from studies of about a dozen different types of moral behavior. The results suggest that ethicists behave no morally better on average or any more consistently with their espoused values. Using a combination of direct observation and self-report measures, I examine: the misappropriation of library books, voting in public elections, courtesy at professional meetings, responsiveness to student emails, charitable donation, organ and blood donation, staying in touch with one's mother, vegetarianism, honesty in responses to surveys, nonpayment of conference registration fees, Nazi party membership in the 1930s, and peer evaluation of overall moral behavior.

 

Public Seminar Series 2011-2012

Tuesday 22nd November 2011

Richard Moore (Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology)

A Gricean Minimalist approach to the cognition of communicative intentions

2-4pm, Venue: Arts Tower, AT-104. All are welcome!

Abstract

In this paper I propose an account of the intentional structure of communication that corresponds closely to the one first described by Paul Grice. Many have objected that Gricean communicative intentions could be entertained by neither young children nor great apes. However, I argue that the cognition required for the production and comprehension of these communicative intentions is less demanding than traditional interpretations of Grice have implicated - requiring neither a concept of belief, nor of the ability to entertain high-order meta-representations. Rather, in communication speakers exploit lower-level embodied processes - in the form of ostensive cues - that, when combined with words or gestures, are sufficient to enact communicative intent. I argue that interlocutors are also sensitive to speakers' performance of these cues, and that they consequently facilitate their interpretation of speakers' utterances. However, I argue for a weaker interpretation of the function of ostensive cues than has been advocated in recent years by Gyorgy Gergely and Gergely Csibra; and support this interpretation with new empirical data.

Once the intentional structure of communication is understood in terms of the actions by which these intentions are enacted, it becomes plausible to think that not only the communicative acts of young children but perhaps also the gestures of great apes have something like a Gricean intentional structure.

 

Tuesday 29nd November 2011

Mihaela Popa (School of Computer Science, University of Birmingham)

The Semantics/Pragmatics of Metaphor and Irony: the Embedding Criterion

2-4pm, Venue: Hicks Building, HI-LTB. All are welcome!

Abstract

This paper exploits commonly held theories of metaphor and irony so as to evaluate ‘embedding’ as a criterion for distinguishing an utterance’s truth-conditional content from its implicatures (§1). I argue that the embedding criterion classifies both the metaphorical content and the ironical content as truth-conditional (at least in some cases), but that it does so correctly only in the case of metaphorical content (§2). Its classification of ironical content as truth-conditional is incorrect (§3).

 

Thursday 1st December 2011

Joanna Wimpenny (Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield)

Tool-related cognition in New Caledonian Crows

2-4pm, Venue: Firth Court, Tapestry Room. All are welcome!

 


UK Experimental Philosophy Group

Robin Scaife (Sheffield), James Andow (Nottingham), and Bryony Pierce (Bristol) have set up a new experimental philosophy group, with the support of Stephen Stich, Professor of Philosophy, Rutgers and Honorary Professor of Philosophy, Sheffield.

An inaugural meeting/workshop will be held at Bristol University on Wed 15th of Sep 1pm-6.30pm. The Keynote speakers will be Prof. David Papineau (KCL) and Dr. Finn Spicer (Bristol). Details of a call for papers can be found at: http://sites.google.com/site/experimentalphilosophygroupuk/home/events

The workshop will be free. However, due to space limitations participants will be required to register in advance by e-mailing experimentalphilosophyuk@gmail.com

Experimental Philosophy Group UK will provide a forum for UK-based researchers from all disciplines who use experimental methods to investigate philosophical topics or have a research interest in this important, burgeoning field. Empirical evidence is relevant in many philosophical debates and experimental philosophy provides the resources for researchers to gather that evidence, enabling researchers to design experiments that address specific questions of philosophical significance. Anyone interested in joining the group should contact experimentalphilosophyuk@gmail.com or join the Facebook group. The only criteria for membership are involvement in UK-based research and an interest in experimental philosophy.

News and information about the group will be posted on Facebook and the new website at http://sites.google.com/site/experimentalphilosophygroupuk.


Public Seminar Series

Seminars will be held in the Humanities Research Institute seminar room (click here for directions) unless otherwise noted. Everyone is welcome!

Friday 21st May 2010

Tom Stafford (Psychology, University of Sheffield)

An empirical test of some philosophies of science

This seminar will be held in the Arts Tower, LT8, 2.30-4.30pm.

Futher Seminars for 2009-2010 TBA shortly


Postgraduate and Staff Interdisciplinary Reading Groups

Spring 2010—Reading Group on Evolutionary Psychology and Feminism

 


Recent Public Seminars

 

Thursday 10th December 2009

Jamie Tehrani (Anthropology, University of Durham)

Descent, convergence and the phylogenetic analysis of culture: examples from traditional crafts and folktales

This seminar will be held in the Humanities Research Institute seminar room (click here for directions), 1.30-3.30pm.

Abstract

The question of whether similarities among assemblages are due to common descent or arose independently is a key problem in both biological and cultural evolution. In this talk I discuss how methods that were originally developed in the former field are being applied to the latter, focusing in particular on traditional crafts and folktales. Phylogenetic analyses of these traditions demonstrate that, despite the rapid pace of cultural change and the effects of borrowing and blending among societies, it is possible to reconstruct historically deep, coherent lineages of cultural descent. These lineages provide a means of identifying instances of convergence between historically unrelated assemblages, opening new avenues for exploring the relationships between mind, culture and environment.

Tuesday 10th November 2009

Ron Mallon (Philosophy, University of Utah)

Constructing Race Thought: Integrating Evolutionary Cognitive and Social Constructionist Approaches to Racial Cognition

Leverhulme Lectures on Moral Psychology

Stephen Stich (Leverhulme Visiting Professor of Philosophy, University of Sheffield)

Professor Stephen Stich (Philosophy, Rutgers University), Leverhulme Visiting Professor of Philosophy at the University of Sheffield from March to May 2009, gave a series of four public Leverhulme Lectures in May 2009 on Moral Psychology.

Wednesday, May 6, 2009: The Definition of Morality

Monday, May 11, 2009: The Persistence of Moral Disagreement

Monday, May 18, 2009: The Evolution of Morality

Wednesday, May 27, 2009: Egoism vs. Altruism: Deconstructing the Debate

 

All lectures held in the Douglas Knoop Centre at the Humanities Research Institute (click here for directions) from 5.30-7.15pm, followed by an informal drinks reception. Everyone is welcome!

 

imageThese lectures are made possible through the generous support of the Leverhulme Trust

 

 

Monday December 1st 2008

Kimmo Eriksson (Mathematics & Physics, Mälardalen University)

'She is, oh, fiftyfive, sixtyfive years?': Usage of approximating expressions.

Abstract

An approximating pair is a pair of numbers (a,b) used in a single phrase (”two, three years ago”). Only certain combinations of numbers seem to be used in such phrases - it is tempting to talk about a "grammar" of approximating pairs. It has been debated what this grammar looks like and why (social convention, or determination by some underlying factors, or even an innate grammar a la Chomsky). I will talk about an ongoing project, joint with David Geary and coworkers, where we shed light on these issues through a first study of what approximating pairs people (Swedes and Americans) actually accept. I will also briefly describe our Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution at Stockholm University.

Friday 23rd May 2008

Greta Defeyter (Psychology, Northumbria University)

Adult’s and children’s intuitions about artifact function

Abstract

Researchers in cognitive science have increasingly begun to focus on questions surrounding the capacity to represent artifact kinds (see Lawrence & Margolis, in press). Of specific interest to researchers in cognitive development have been the dual questions of what information is at the core of early artifact representations, and to what extent this information changes over development. Some researchers argue that adults and even young children represent information about an object’s ‘designed function’ (e.g. the use intended by the designer) as central to artifact representations (e.g. Diesendruck, Markson & Bloom, 2003; Kemler Nelson, Herron & Morris, 2002).  Others have stressed the importance of shared conventional use (Siegal & Callanan, 2005, April); and non-accidental use (Matan & Carey, 2001). An issue that is often obscured within this debate has been the possible differences between the information that is important for categorising artifacts versus that important to determining the function of artifacts. The current paper provides evidence for a dissociation between these questions (see also German & Johnson, 2002; Jaswal, 2005), while extending the range of kinds of information to include information about shared conventional use (as well as idiosyncratic use by one owner).

Thursday 1st May 2008

Tim Bayne (Philosophy, University of Oxford)

Consciousness and its markers

Abstract

This paper examines the question of what we should take as markers of consciousness. Although my primary aim is to chart the conceptual space surrounding the question of what we should take as makers of consciousness, I do evaluate some proposed markers of consciousness.

Background reading

Owen et al. (2006). Detecting awareness in the vegetative state. Science, 313: 1402.

Block, N. (2002). The Harder Problem of Consciousness. The Journal of Philosophy, XCIX, 8, 391-425.

Thursday 17th April 2008

Claudia Uller (Psychology, University of Essex)

The nonverbal representation of number: Developmental and evolutionary considerations

18 May 2007

Paulo Sousa (Institute of Culture and Cognition, Queen's University, Belfast)

The folk concept of moral responsibility: a cognitive exploration

This seminar will be held in the Humanities Research Institute seminar room from 3–5 pm, Friday 18 May 2007. The seminar is open to all. (Click here for directions).

26 April 2007

Finn Spicer (Philosophy, University of Bristol)

Is it a conceptual truth about knowledge that knowledge is factive?

This seminar will be held in the Humanities Research Institute seminar room from 3–5 pm, Thursday, 26 April 2007. The seminar is open to all. (Click here for directions).

8 March 2007

Martin Doherty (Psychology, University of Stirling)

Is understanding gaze a developmental precursor to understanding belief?

This seminar will be held in the Arts Tower Board Room, on the first floor of the Arts Tower, from 3–5 pm, Thursday, 8 March 2007. The seminar is open to all.

Optional background reading:

Doherty, M.J. (2006). The development of mentalistic gaze understanding. Infant and Child Development, 15, 179-186.

10 January 2007

Letitia Naigles (Psychology, University of Connecticut)

A modern saga of Noah's Ark: Cross-linguistic approaches to children's verb learning and acquisition of argument structure

This seminar will be held in the Humanities Research Institute seminar room from 3–5 pm, Wednesday, 10 January 2007. The seminar is open to all. (Click here for directions).

Optional background reading:

Lee, J. & Naigles, L. R. (2005). Input to Verb Learning in Mandarin Chinese: A Role for Syntactic Bootstrapping. Developmental Psychology, 41, 529-540.

Naigles, L. R., & Lehrer, N. (2002). Language-general and language-specific influences on children’s acquisition of argument structure: a comparison of French and English. Journal of Child Language, 29, 545-566.


Reading Groups

Autumn 2014—Reading Group on Philosophy of Science

We will be meeting on Mondays 10am in the Philosophy Department, room in the Attic, to discuss scientific eliminativism from a broad perspective and the notion of natural kind in different domains. Please contact Bernardo Pino for more details.

Autumn 2014—Reading Group on Philosophy of Language

This group will meet on Thursdays at 2am in the Philosophy Department, room B23. It will discuss "what is said and the semantics/pragmatics distinction". If you are interested in joininig, please contact Neri Marsili and Francesco Antillici

Autumn 2014—Reading Group on Cognitive Development

This group will be meeting on Wednesdays at 11am in the Philosophy Department, room B09. We will discuss Susan Carey's book on conceptual development and competing views. To join this group please contact Miklos Kurthy

Autumn 2014—Reading Group on Philosophy of Cognitive Science

It will meet on Wednesdays at 12noon in the Philosophy Department, room B09. The group will focus on the metaphysics of reference, discussing some of the most controversial issues related to it. To join the group contact Bernardo Pino

Spring 2014—Reading Group on Philosophy of Mind and Philosophy of Psychology

This group will be meeting at the Humanities Research Institute (HRI) every Tuesday, starting on March 11. We will discuss issues in the current debate about the nature and role of modal and amodal representations probably involved in reflective thinking. To join the reading group please contact Bernardo Pino or Francesco Antilici.

Autumn 2013—Reading Group on Cognitive Science

The Cognitive Science reading group is an occasion to read and discuss articles related to current issues in the interdisciplinary study of cognition. It will meet every Tuesday at 5pm in Jessop West, Hub Room 3 (on the third floor). To join the reading group please contact Philipp Rau.

Autumn 2012—Reading Group on Philosophy of Psychiatry

This reading group will be discussing philosophical issues concerning the nature of mental illness. We will start reading Rachel Cooper's "Psychiatry and Philosophy of Science" to then continue with other readings according to the interests of the reading group. Meetings will be held on Thursdays at 4pm in the Philosophy Department, room B23.

Autumn 2009—Reading Group on Evolutionary Approaches to Mind and Psychology

This reading group will be discussing recent work in philosophy and the cognitive sciences on evolutionary approaches to understanding the mind, examing the diverstiy of such approaches and their critics. Further details to be posted shortly.

Autumn 2008—Reading Group on Artefacts & Material Culture

This reading group is linked to the Department's AHRC Culture and the Mind Project. We will be discussing recent work in philosophy, psychology and anthropology on the cognitive structures underlying our interactions with artefacts and material culture. It will meet every other week alternating with the Philosophy of Psychology reading group. Click here for more details.

Spring 2008—Reading Group on Philosophy of Psychology

This reading group will look at some classic and recent debates about issues in the Philosophy of Psychology. It will meet every other week alternating with the Artefacts reading group. Click here for more details.

Spring 2008—Reading Group on Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemology

The Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemology Reading Group will be continuing this semester, running alongside the Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemology component of the Centre's Culture and the Mind Project. We will be meeting fornightly to discuss work in philosophy, psychology and anthropology on folk psychology and folk epistemology. Click here for more details.

Spring 2008—Reading Group on Norms and Moral Psychology

The Norms and Moral Psychology Reading Group will be continuing this semester, running alongside the Norms and Moral Psychology component of the Centre's Culture and the Mind Project. This group will meet fortnightly, alternating with the Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemology Reading Group. Click here for more details.

Autumn 2007—Reading Group on Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemology

The Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemology Reading Group will be continuing this year, running alongside the Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemology component of the Centre's Culture and the Mind Project. We will be meeting fornightly to discuss work in philosophy, psychology and anthropology on folk psychology and folk epistemology.

Autumn 2007—Reading Group on Norms and Moral Psychology

This year we be starting a new reading group that will focus on the second phase of the Culture and the Mind Project, which is concerned with Norms and Moral Psychology. This group will meet fortnightly, alternating with the Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemology Reading Group.

Spring 2007—Reading Group on Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemology

Picking up where we left off last semester, we will continue to meet weekly to discuss work in philosophy, anthropology, psychology on folk psychology and folk epistemology. To join the reading group, please contact Stephen Laurence.

Autumn 2006—Reading Group on Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemology

This reading group will meet weekly to discuss work in philosophy, anthropology, psychology on folk psychology and folk epistemology. To join the reading group, please contact Stephen Laurence.

Autumn 2006—Reading Group on Moral Psychology

This reading group will meet weekly to discuss work in philosophy and psychology on moral psychology. To join the reading group, please contact Robin Scaife.


Recent Conferences and Workshops

image15-17 April 2011 — Conference on Culture and the Mind: Artefacts and Material Culture associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This public conference was the final event associated with the third phase of the AHRC Culture and the Mind project, which has been exploring cross-cultural universals and cross-cultural variability in the domains of artifacts and material culture.

13-14 April 2011— Core Group Meeting on Norms and Moral Psychology associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This meeting was the fourth of a series of meetings for core participants in the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project to follow up from anthropological fieldwork on Norms and Moral Psychology.

8-9 January 2011— Core Group Meeting on Norms and Moral Psychology associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This meeting was the third of a series of meetings for core participants in the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project to follow up from anthropological fieldwork on Norms and Moral Psychology.

6-7 January 2011— Core Group Meeting on Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemology associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This meeting was the fourth of a series of meetings for core participants in the AHRC Culture and the Mind Projectfollow up from anthropological fieldwork on Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemology.

image17-19 September 2010 — Conference on Culture and the Mind: Norms and Moral Psychology associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This public conference was the final event associated with the second phase of the AHRC Culture and the Mind project, which has been exploring cross-cultural universals and cross-cultural variability in the domains of norms and moral psychology.

15-16 September 2010 — Core Group Meeting on Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemology associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This meeting was the third of a series of meetings for core participants in the AHRC Culture and the Mind Projectfollow up from anthropological fieldwork on Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemology.

17-18 April 2010— Core Group Meeting on Norms and Moral Psychology associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This meeting was the second of a series of meetings for core participants in the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project to follow up from anthropological fieldwork on Norms and Moral Psychology.

15-16 April 2010— Core Group Meeting on Artifacts and Material Culture associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This meeting was the third of a series of meetings for core participants in the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project to follow up from workshops from the previous year and prepare for anthropological fieldwork.

9-10 January 2010— Core Group Meeting on Norms and Moral Psychology associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This meeting was the first of a series of meetings for core participants in the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project to follow up from anthropological fieldwork on Norms and Moral Psychology.

7-8 January 2010— Core Group Meeting on Artifacts and Material Culture associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This meeting was the second of a series of meetings for core participants in the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project to follow up from workshops from the previous year and prepare for anthropological fieldwork.

image11-13 September 2009 Conference on Culture and the Mind: Folk Psychology, Folk Epistemology, and Cultural Transmission associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This public conference was the final event associated with the first phase of the AHRC Culture and the Mind project, which has been exploring cross-cultural universals and cross-cultural variability in the domains of folk psychology and folk epistemology.

9-10 September 2009 — Core Group Meeting on Artifacts and Material Culture associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This meeting was the first of a series of meetings for core participants in the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project to follow up from workshops from the previous year and prepare for anthropological fieldwork.

15-17 May 2009 — WORKSHOP on Artefacts and Material Culture associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This workshop was the third of a series of three preparatory closed workshops associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project.

4-5 April 2009 — Core Group Meeting on Norms and Moral Psychology associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This meeting was the third of a series of meetings for core participants in the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project to follow up from workshops from the previous year and prepare for anthropological fieldwork.

2-3 April 2009 — Core Group Meeting on Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemology associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This meeting was the second of a series of meetings for core participants in the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project to follow up from anthropological fieldwork on Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemology.

9-11 January 2009 — WORKSHOP on Artefacts and Material Culture associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This workshop was the second of a series of three preparatory closed workshops associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project.

7 January 2009 — Core Group Meeting on Norms and Moral Psychology associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This meeting was the second of a series of meetings for core participants in the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project to follow up from workshops from the previous year and prepare for anthropological fieldwork.

6 January 2009 — Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemics Data Analysis Meeting associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This meeting was the first of a series of meetings for core participants in the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project to follow up from anthropological fieldwork from the previous year.

4-5 October 2008 — WORKSHOP on Artefacts and Material Culture associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This workshop was the first of a series of three preparatory closed workshops associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project.

3 October 2008 — Core Group Meeting on Norms and Moral Psychology associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This meeting was the first of a series of meetings for core participants in the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project to follow up from workshops from the previous year and prepare for anthropological fieldwork.

22-23 March 2008 — WORKSHOP on Norms and Moral Psychology associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This workshop was the third of a series of three preparatory closed workshops associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project.

21 March 2008 — Core Group Meeting on Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemics associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This meeting was the third of a series of meetings for core participants in the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project to follow up from workshops from the previous year and prepare for anthropological fieldwork.

19-20 January 2008 — WORKSHOP on Norms and Moral Psychology associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This workshop was the second of a series of three preparatory closed workshops associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project.

18 January 2008 — Core Group Meeting on Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemics associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This meeting was the second of a series of meetings for core participants in the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project to follow up from workshops from the previous year and prepare for anthropological fieldwork.

20-21 October 2007 — WORKSHOP on Norms and Moral Psychology associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This workshop was the first of a series of three preparatory closed workshops associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project.

19 October 2007 — Core Group Meeting on Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemics associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This meeting was the first of a series of meetings for core participants in the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project to follow up from workshops from the previous year and prepare for anthropological fieldwork.

13-15 April 2007 — WORKSHOP on Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemics associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This workshop was the third of a series of three preparatory closed workshops associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project.

12-14 January 2007 — WORKSHOP on Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemics associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This workshop was the second of a series of three preparatory closed workshops associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project.

20–22 October 2006 — WORKSHOP on Folk Psychology and Folk Epistemics associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project

This workshop was the first of a series of three preparatory closed workshops associated with the AHRC Culture and the Mind Project.

17–18 June 2006 — Altruism and Moral Psychology Conference

This interdisciplinary conference explored the psychological underpinnings of altruism and moral norms, and the implications of these psychological systems for ethical theory